#BeBold Sharing Critical Content

image from openclipart.org from J4p4n

“I think it would be therapeutic for me to write a post for our blog where I tear the shit out of movie x.” Zach said.  

I smiled and nodded, happy he planned to contribute to our NAWG blog.  

“But would a negative post benefit our blog in the long run?”  I wondered.  

Another group member and I resolved we would keep our blog a positive constructive place.  Then again, Zach is our resident curmudgeon, if anyone can get away with a grouchy post, it’s him.

As I‘ve been viewing more content, I keep coming back to wondering if critical content is part of a healthy blogging habit.  And if “negative” or “rant” content has a place, what’s the correct ratio to add it into a blog?  Should ever blog or blogger share all opinions whether negative or positive?  Am I as positive as. I portray, or is that a persona shown for approval?   Even in some of my perky posts, on the edges lingers this acknowledgement of themes I don’t like.  

Today there will be no dodging the question.  Should we blog critical, negative, snarky, or tea spilling posts?

The Concerns

-Being seen as petty/mean/opinionated/loud/aggressive/bossy

-Being seen as a person who views writing as a competition and your review as a way to tear down the competition

-Risk of hurting the feelings of another human being

-Burning through the community’s goodwill for you

-Bringing you own work forward for scrutiny as you’ve scrutinized others

-Making an error or oversight in your analysis could cause you being on the end of critical content.  Or you may see your own oversight, go to adjust your post and learn you’ve created an audience not open to evolving opinions.

-Negative attention is still attention and if a book/technique is damaging, you may choose not to mention them at all so you don’t accidentally drive sales to something you don’t support

-Closing venues for conversation and becoming a place to come bash an idea

-Crossing the line and getting personal in an attack (and this is NEVER) good.  

-Depending on what you don’t like, risking the chance you’ll stand in the company of other opinions you find offensive or wrong

The Pros

-People love drama/controversy.  There is a reason videos and posts labeled “spilling the tea” or “throwing shade” rank so high and it’s because everyone loves to watch a fight.  

-As Zach said, rants are therapeutic

-Sometimes critical or negative reviews are a person’s truth and I believe authenticity is more important than being nice. 

-Others can misinterpret silence as approval and I don’t want to support something I didn’t like.

-Bringing critical opinions forward presents a whole and balanced person.  Not someone full of eternal praise

-A negative element of an otherwise good work should be called out.  A person can love something that isn’t perfect and acknowledging flaws is part of a full discussion

-The things I didn’t like may help a crowd of people who like those elements find a new favorite.  What I didn’t like might be something you love about a book

The Outcome 

This conversation is more personal than the other #bebold articles because I present as a positive person.  Get to know me better and I’ll spin out into a rant on X or Y and I like to think it’s funny.  People laugh, whether from the shock of me going from sunshine to dark in a blink of an eye or because I have a strong delivery, is hard to tell.  The thing is, I like to read a room before sharing, and you can’t read a room in the internet.

Unlike the “silence is approval school” I’m from the “if you have nothingnice to say, then say nothing” school.  I’m sensitive to even small gestures of disapproval in others and worry over their reactions if they find out I don’t enjoy their favorite show.  In the past, I’ve compromised under the guise of kindness.  I post all reviews to Goodreads but don’t make blogs from bad books.  Recently I’d considered writing a bottom 5 books of 2018 and dismissed the idea.  Three of the books were from a single author and it struck me as excessively mean spirited to single out an author this way.  

 I’m dipping my toes into critical reviews while blogging.  First, I wrote a post on why I stopped reading Daily Science Fiction.  It’s not mean, but it expresses that I didn’t like the site or most of the stories on offer.  My 2018 book year in review shares both positive and negative thoughts on books.  Even then, most of my critical feedback revolves around non-fiction books that present bad/dangerous science.  I feel like giving them lower scores is a public service.  Do your research world!

  I wrote a critical review on a writing class I took.  There I spoke out because I’d paid money for the class.  If it had been free, there would be no post. The posts gathered the low end of average views.  

Currently I’m brainstorming a series of posts called “Writing Cliches” where I discuss overused techniques in genres and why they bother me/what else you can do.  I think it will be snarky fun with a goal of helping writers avoid played out scenarios and offering other ways to move the story. 

Should you write a critical post?  I don’t really know.  

  I love reading critical posts where the writer explores what worked, where they suggest how idea x could come across better, or where they pitch a “better” story.  Occasionally, I even enjoy a certain level of mean snark.  That said, I’m not comfortable with the format.  Even as I enjoy consuming some of this style of content, I prefer to create the helpful, glass half full kinds of posts.  More than the other posts discussed in this #BeBold series, I suggest moderation.  A few critical posts go a long way after all.  

Looking for more like this? Try the other #BeBold posts “Posting Metrics” and “Sharing Fiction for Free

#BeBold Writing and Publishing Fiction For Free

 

Image from openclipart.org by Klaro

Creative writers often debate the wisdom of publishing fiction and short stories to their blogs or posting a creation process behind their creations.  In this post, I will explore the “pros” and “cons” of content.  The topic includes posting short works to a blog or through another site for free, posting spin off works, and posting a “how I made story x”style posts.  In the interest of full disclosure, I’m in favor of all these style posts and my bias shows. Please consider checking out part one in my Be Bold Series regarding posting site metrics on my personal blog

The Concerns

-You are wasting a story you could have gotten published for profit

-The story you post may be stolen by an unscrupulous person and they may get it published for profit or collect credit on their better known site

-You may have held onto the story, continued to work on it and come up a longer, more complete story instead of the short work you published

-Offering work for free reduces the market for paid work.  Why pay money when you can get writing for free?

-Your work may be and the work of your peers may be devalued.  Some believe that free writing is bad writing.  There’s a further idea that free blog writing is writing that could not have been “legitimately” published so they released it “on the cheap.”

-There are concerns around formatting and presentation of fictional works posted to a blog, just as there are formatting challenges through epub.

The Pros

-You as a writer offer readers a sample of your style and theme so they can make a better informed decision if they want to commit to a longer work.  The works I’ve published highlight elements in writing I specialize in and may help me find the right audience home.

-Alternatively, you may have a one off story that doesn’t fit your genre and still wish to share it.  I have a drama piece that‘s out of place with my over all portfolio I‘d one day like to publish.  I don’t want to learn all the ins and outs of the drama genre for one piece, a simple answer may be to publish it through a blog.

-You’ve written a work for fun.  Our writing group exercises often fall in this category.  We were challenging ourselves and just want to share the results.

-You want more direct interaction with your audience.  One thing I love about publishing to a blog is that readers post their thoughts and I enjoy that.  Yes I can get feedback via a review on a work, but reviews are for other readers.  A comment is for both the author and other readers.  It’s nice to have an open conversation with my readers.

-Your shorts may be companion pieces to a longer work.  For example: I have a “Downtown Huntsville Tourist Trap” book written from the perspective of the characters from “Follow Me: Tattered Veils”. I also have a drink recipe guide and a tarot guide, all a possible collections for people who enjoy my novel and want more from the voices of these characters.  I have deleted scenes I may publish to add to the novel hype when I launch the book.  Here, I’m selling my novel but adding free bonus material because giving away some writing doesn’t mean I don‘t charge for other works.

The Outcome 

Since I have posted flash fiction and short fiction, it’s obvious I’m in favor of releasing my writing through blog posts.  However, I will add that it comes down to a case of audience or career.  I accept that writing can never be a career for me (for many reasons).  My writers’ goals include finding and keeping the largest audience the themes and style of my writing will allow.  Is that ten people or a million: I’m not sure.  Adding short stories, blogging, and a social media presence are all tactics I’m incorporating to find out.  

I’ve never been shy regarding posting my stories.  There are a few I regret sharing, but those are from a long buried high school account.  Even then, it’s more about the cringe factor than the “missed opportunity” or “devalued work”.  

What do you think?  Do you read short stories from blogs and free sites?  Do you post your own stories for free?  Is there a situation where you would give away content?  Are there situations where you would never give away content?  Share any thoughts you have on getting published for free or reading work that’s been published for free.