4 Kinds of Writers’ and When They Share Their Work

When signing up to be a critique partner, it’s important to consider where in process a writer may be and tailor the advice to where they are and what their goals are. Today we’ll go over 4 kinds of writers I’ve discovered and some characteristics that may help us dig deeper into where they are coming from.

The Share and Share A Like Writer

  • In process with a first draft. 
  • May be excited to share something.
  • May be stuck and looking to bounce ideas.
  • May still be working out the characters/concept/elements of the manuscript.
  • Probably has minimal editing or polish—and is not in a place to receive major refining feedback

The First Draft Sneak Peek

  • The manuscript has a beginning, middle, and ending.
  • May have a vague sense of short comings in the work and need help pinning them down.
  • May have an acute sense of short comings in the work and need brainstorming to correct.
  • May be “too close” to the manuscript and seek the distance of fresh eyes.

The Middle Draft In It To Win It

  • The 2nd or the 72nd iteration of a work.  Writers have completed major story building aspects of a manuscript and are working on polish.
  • Major structural edits are complete.  The order of the manuscript and all the major scenes are settled.
  • Character arcs are set and ready for review.

The Hybrid Writer

  • May or may not have a complete manuscript.  
  • The manuscript has some level of polish and revision, but the writer is not able to move on yet, they are in a seeking or consideration process.
  • Most easy to identify this manuscript because of it’s inconsistently applied polished some section will be in progress, others will be a first draft stage, while other sections may appear as a finalized manuscript.

What do you think? Do these groups cover all the different kinds of writers you know? Are there other traits your recognize or other details you think critique partners should look for?

Stay tuned and next week we’ll go further in depth with suggestions for what to critique or not for each of these stages of writing!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *