Feburary Submissions of Interest

Feb 10th

Grumpy Old Gods Vol. 7: 3,000-4,000 words a speculative fiction (mythic fiction preferred) on trickster gods pays royalties

Feb 14th

The One and Future King: 5,000-10,000 word on a King Arthur-ish story but don’t base it on current shows depicting his time pays royalties

Feb 15th

Eerie River Publishing: 1,000-5,000 words “it calls from the forest” speculative dark horror stories pays royalties

Feb 16th

Inverted Fairy Tales and Folklore: 1,000-8,000 words fairy tale related-stories based on non-mainstream characters pay $.04 a word

Feb 22nd

Silk & Steel: 3,000-7,000 words “Princess and swordswoman. Scholar and mecha pilot. Warrior women… and the courtly ladies who love them.” pay $.08 a word

Feb 29th

Parsec Ink: up to 5,000 words scifi, fantasy, and horror stories with the theme of extinction pay $.03 a word

A Haunted Yuletide: 1,000-10,000 words “Do you know what a Christmas story needs? More Ghost stories.” pays royalties

2019 Planning and How I Got to 2020

There was a lot I wanted to accomplish in my 2019 writing practice AND there was a lot going on in my job.  To balance work/personal/writing life, I turned to a planner.  Well, I went through several planners to get to my current system.

Why a paper planner when I’ve used Jorte for years?

2018 was very stressful for me and there was a lot I was tracking.  My Jorte calendar was too cluttered.  Looking at it created my anxiety than it alleviated. And nothing is as satisfying as checking, crossing out, or highlighting a task or series of tasks.  Paper and pen is a comfort for me in times of high anxiety.

My Organizational Journey

I started with a huge monthly desk calendar.  BUT in the first week it became clear that there was TOO much for even the largest monthly wall calendar.  I needed a monthly and weekly glance.

Next purchase was a Simplified Planner.  It had a hard cover with gold edges and bright cheery colors within.  The weekly view let me carve out the time I worked vs my “free time” and it gave me a heads up regarding what was pending.  It’s major drawback was combining the Saturday/Sunday in the weekly view.  As a retail person I need the most detail on my Saturday/Sunday either when I work or when I have it off.  Most things in my life happen on these days.

So I moved on to an Inner Guide Planner and a paper journaling system in July.   The Inner Guide gave me more than a full 7 day a week spread, it also helped me make monthly goals in different categories like the professional, creative, family, fun, etc.  This helped me figure out what I was spending time on and if it was what I wanted to spend time on.  This planner helped crystallized the need to change day jobs, and it helped refocus me on my novel publication countless times.  I think most people would find the Inner Guide Planner of immense value, especially for its price point.  It was $32 and even using it only from July-Dec, I got that value back.

A blank journal gave me freedom and space to write whatever whenever.  Lists, complaints/venting, future plans, progress reports, research, etc.  It also gave me unlimited space, and I’m long winded.

However, I wanted more.  I wanted a space to write my plans and goals and another space to record actual progress on those goals.  There wasn’t enough space in a weekly planner for that so I did some research and purchased a She Plans Daily Planner.

I love this planner.  It’s a quarterly softbound sewn book I carry with me and make notes regarding the way I spend my time.  At a glance I can see how much time I spend working, blogging, on social media, or “wasting time” gaming/watching YouTube by color blocking my day off using the half hour 6-8:30 pm marks provided in they system.  There’s an untimed space for “to do” where I make notes on ideas/shopping needs/tasks as they come to me and review them each week to prioritize what I need or should plan out.  There’s a space for inspiration I fill out with a writing quote every day.  Tracking my time helps me clarify what I want and what I’m willing to do to get it done.

And all this lead me to 2020 organizational routine.  For 2020 I have a desk full of plans to keep me on track with my writing, health, and work.  I will share the current 2020 system in my next post and talk about moving forward.  I hope this post helped offer some tools you could use to help you achieve your goals.  Are you a planner or a seat of the pants type writer?  Do you have goals and what do you do if you meet them?  What do you do when you don’t reach your goals?  Do you have a favorite tool: what is it and why?

Bells and Whistles: Habitica for Fantasy Writers

Habitica is a free online site (and phone app because everything is a phone app right now) that allows you to write goals and track your progress.  Like all progress trackers, Habitica gives users satifaction by checking off completed tasks and clearing a dashboard.  More than just checking a box, the site gives the user points that allows them to customize and build a small fantasy character.  Doing dishes or completing a writing goal isn’t just exciting in its own sake, now your little character can level up to achieve better armor or a better attack.  While “gamifying” work can appeal to anyone, I thought the fantasy character nature may appeal to fantasy or scifi writers.

 

There are three styles of habits one can write.

 

“Habits” or goals that a user strives to repeat daily or 2-3 times a week.  They are important but the user doesn’t want to be penalized if they don’t get around to completing these things every day.  Instead the habits will color coat, suggesting how good a person is at completing them but not setting anyone back if they don’t get to an item every day.

 

“Dailies” are mandatory tasks that renew each day.  If you DO NOT complete them, they will negatively impact your little avatar.  This is a more carrot/stick method of goal planning where completing the goals gives your character great bonuses but forgetting to do them too often will lead to your avatar passing out.

 

“To-Dos” are one time, one-day style tasks.  Finishing them is epic, but there’s no set timeline on getting to them and there is no need to repeat the tasks.

 

How I use Habitica as a writer

While I first used Habitica for the “Dailies” section.  Forcing myself to either “put up or shut up,” I find it’s healthier for me to use the “Habits” and “To-Do” sections.  It makes me less likely to micro manage my time or fill up my goal list with things I KNOW I will complete so I can collect the points.  Checking off boxes and making plans makes me feel good and sometimes I’ll make a ton of plans instead of working on anything.  Habitica enables this kind of behavior, so if this is you, beware.

 

I use the “Habits” section to suggest things I like “check social media X for X amount of time,” “respond to 2 people in y forum,”  or “write x amount of words this week.”  Habitica can also be a reminder system.  It helps me remember to focus on general life or well-being items outside of writing specific goals.

Sometimes Habitica is just a tracking system.  If I am trying to decide between projects I wanted to work on, I might create a habit for each book/story and see which one I checked off the most.

 

I planned to use the “To-Dos” to manage all my creative writing ideas, but it’s unnecessary.  I’m excited about all my story ideas and can just keep a running paper list.  I jump into creative projects without problem.  Instead my “To-Dos” fill with ideas for blog posts and suggestions regarding what to edit next.  This way when I schedule time to write up blog posts, I don’t waste time wondering what topics to cover.

 

Overall, Habitica has helped me stay organized and focused as a writer.  While any list could do this.  There is extra incentive to do well when there’s a cute little avatar face staring back at me asking for the next couple points to level up.  I realize this won’t work for everyone, but if you’re in a rut, it might be worth trying.

 

Talk to me!  Do you use any habit trackers in your writing?  Do you use a planner at all or does all structure repel you?  How do you feel about deadlines and goals when it comes to your writing or creative process?

 

Looking for more productivity and planning goodness?  Check out my 2019 Goals Review. I’ve got a post on my 2020 writer’s goals, how I’m tracking those goals, and I have some advise on how to plan a rough draft for aspiring writers.

Goal Planning Advice: Getting Through a Rough Draft

It’s easy to say “I want to write a novel” or “I want to be a blogger” or even “I want to grow my following” and it’s much harder achieve these goals.  Today, I want to talk about how to set and achieve goals. 

  1. Have a clear image of what a successful end would look like.  Today’s end goal will be “I want to complete my first draft.”
  2. Create a deadline.  For example: “I want a rough draft at the end of the year.”  My “big goals” are always end of the year goals.  Thinking ahead more than a year makes me sad and anxious.  It’s too big and there are too many places where the plan could go awry.  You have to find your own large goal sweet spot.  Maybe you’ve got what it takes for the five-year plan or maybe you only want 30-90 days.
  3. Create goals and timelines for each chunk.  You might use your story arc to create these goals.  Like if you have a three act story, you want to spend 3 months writing the intro 4 months writing the middle and 5 months writing the back third.  Or you might break the book by chapters and decide to write 2-3 chapters a month.  Personally, I use straight word counts, but everyone will have their own organization.
  4. Identify any stumbling blocks in achieving your goal.  I can type about 1,000 words an hour once I get into a groove.    What holds me up is research. 
  5. Create a way to move around the “hard parts.” To succeed in my plans, I need to limit my research or mark-up areas where I’ll need to verify or detail out in a second draft (if I even keep whatever scene it is).  Besides that, I need to set a timer when I start researching.  No more than 45 minutes of impromptu studying.  Any more time needs to be scheduled and accounted for.
  6. Schedule time to meet your goals.  I can’t write my rough draft every day.  Instead, I’ve scheduled time each week to write and I stick with a weekly word count goal.  My goal is 3,200 words a week.  To reach my goal I’d only need to write about 2,700 words a week, but I’m setting up a safety net with a larger goal.  This way if my story is longer than I thought or if I fall short some weeks, I could still finish my project.
  7. Actually block out the time you plan to use each day/week/month and keep a reminder near you.  Trying something new? I recommend that at first you give yourself double whatever the amount of time you think you need.  If that’s too much time awesome! 
  8. If double the time doesn’t complete your task, relax.  Your experience is normal, don’t be discouraged.  I recommend backing off your yearly goal and just spending a month recording your process.  How far do you get in each writing session?  How long are the sessions, are shorter or longer spurts better for you?  Are there times of day that make writing easier?  Use this self-knowledge to create a more realistic plan and goal for you.  Remember if at first you don’t succeed; you just need a different plan! 

Can you trust my advise, see for yourself. Here’s my 2019 goals and my 2019 results.

Looking for more content like this? Check out my 2020 writer’s goals, my 2020 planner system and Habitica, a goal system that may help you track your own progress.

7 January Calls for Submission: Jess Edition

January 7th

Fiend and Furrows II: 4,000-8,0000 looking for folk horror words pays $.04 a word

January 15th

Cat Ladies of the Apocalypse: 4,000-8,000 words just a person who identifies as female and her cat(s) at the end of the world pays royalties

AE Micro: 200 words theme “stars” pays $.10 word with minimum $20 for very short stories

Atthis Arts: 3,000 word maximum “magical pen” uplifting not horror or gore. $.08 a word

January 30th

Kyanite Press: 2,500-15,000 words with a dystopian post apocalypse themed “shattered worlds” pays royalties

January 31st

Dragon Soul Press: 5,000-15,000 words “reign of queens” pays royalties